Literary Elly May

Speculative Fictionist. Ink-slave. Kinemortophobe.

Posts tagged creative writing

1,768 notes &

When I was excited about life, I didn’t want to write at all. I’ve never written when I was happy. I didn’t want to. But I’ve never had a long period of being happy. Do you think anyone has? I think you can be peaceful for a long time. When I think about it, if I had to choose, I’d rather be happy than write. You see, there’s very little invention in my books. What came first with most of them was the wish to get rid of this awful sadness that weighed me down. I found when I was a child that if I could put the hurt into words, it would go. It leaves a sort of melancholy behind and then it goes. I think it was Somerset Maugham who said that if you “write out” a thing… it doesn’t trouble you so much. you may be left with a vague melancholy, but at least it’s not misery—I suppose it’s like a Catholic going to confession, or like psychoanalysis.
Jean Rhys, in The Paris Review No. 76 | via Austin Kleon’s email newsletter (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: kenbaumann, via thinksideways)

Filed under creative writing depression jean rhys this is 100% true

1,270 notes &

Editing

sarahreesbrennan:

ursulavernon:

I must remind myself—

they can’t tell that I didn’t write this bit immediately after that one

the six months where I ignored the manuscript are not visible to the naked eye

the bit where I put my head in my hands and muttered “I have no idea what I’m doing” takes place in the single space…

This is beautiful and true. They don’t know which were the parts I loved or loathed with all my soul, they do not know about the procrastination, they do not know.

They do not know, and their ignorance is bliss and beauty to me.

Oh beauty beauty beauty. And since I’m working on my novel WIP, this is so helpful. I’m at that third part, the one where I put my head in my hands and mutter about what a failure I am (even though, about 2,000 words later, I can see it’s actually coming along rather nicely).

Filed under creative writing stories fiction editing writer problems

25,966 notes &

amandaonwriting:

The storytelling elements:
1. The Contract

In the very beginning, you have to make a promise. Will this be violent? Scary? Fun? Tense? Dramatic?

2. The Pull

Keep it light in the beginning. You don’t want to scare people away by being too dense — you must trust The Contract.

3. The Incident

This is the event that sets everything in motion. Should occur early and keep the story together.

4. The Reveal

Just before the Point Of No Return, the main character learns what the story is really about.

5. Point Of No Return

The forces of good are faced with an impossible decision that concerns fear, safety, love, hate, revenge or despair.

6. Mini-Climax

Sorry, but you must allow the the forces of evil to have an epic win.

7. All-Is-Lost Moment

The moment where all is lost. You must portray the deepest despair for the forces of good.

8. News Of Hope

This is the possibility for one of the side characters to shine. A light that shines into the total darkness of the moment.

9. Climax

The shit hits the fan and the good puts everything at stake and overcomes — despite impossible odds.

10. The End

Public displays of relief and happiness, love and forgiveness. It’s great! We also learn that the hero has evolved.

Article from Doktor Spinn written by Jerry Silfwer aka Doktor Spinn

amandaonwriting:

The storytelling elements:

1. The Contract

In the very beginning, you have to make a promise. Will this be violent? Scary? Fun? Tense? Dramatic?

2. The Pull

Keep it light in the beginning. You don’t want to scare people away by being too dense — you must trust The Contract.

3. The Incident

This is the event that sets everything in motion. Should occur early and keep the story together.

4. The Reveal

Just before the Point Of No Return, the main character learns what the story is really about.

5. Point Of No Return

The forces of good are faced with an impossible decision that concerns fear, safety, love, hate, revenge or despair.

6. Mini-Climax

Sorry, but you must allow the the forces of evil to have an epic win.

7. All-Is-Lost Moment

The moment where all is lost. You must portray the deepest despair for the forces of good.

8. News Of Hope

This is the possibility for one of the side characters to shine. A light that shines into the total darkness of the moment.

9. Climax

The shit hits the fan and the good puts everything at stake and overcomes — despite impossible odds.

10. The End

Public displays of relief and happiness, love and forgiveness. It’s great! We also learn that the hero has evolved.

Article from Doktor Spinn written by Jerry Silfwer aka Doktor Spinn

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

Filed under writing reference plot plotting creative writing

8,521 notes &

motivation for moving beyond your writing habits: zachariahcarstairs: THAT’S OUT OF CONTEXT: Writing reference list! Go...

zachariahcarstairs:

THAT’S OUT OF CONTEXT: Writing reference list! Go ahead and add more if you have any, this is kind of short!

typewritingly:

Names

Worldbuilding/Setting

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

Filed under writing resources creative writing character names worldbuilding

0 notes &

"No Room for Valor" Ch.1 on JukePop Serials!

So this just happened: my story “No Room for Valor” has been published on JukePop Serials. Since it’s serialized, the first chapter has been posted and subsequent chapters will be published once a month.

Now, here’s what I need you to do. First, read it and enjoy it—I wrote this for you. Next? Share this news—FB, Twitter, Tumblr, anywhere. Last, and most importantly, make a free profile on JukePop Serials so you can +vote each chapter and get email notifications when a new chapter is posted.

I know, I know, the account thing is a turn off. But here’s why this is very important to do: 1) You can’t comment without one, so you’d have no voice tell me how much you love/hate it, which parts made you jump, or what you’d like to see in future chapters; 2) You can only read the first chapter without an account—after that, you’d be stuck in story limbo, never knowing what happened or who it happened to; and 3) +Votes are how both I and JukePop determine the success of a story—more +votes = me knowing you like the story + a higher ranking for the story. The higher the story rank, the more eligible I become to earn monthly cash awards for having a popular story. All this is to say…it’s worth the time to make the account, trust me.

So go check it out! Now! RIGHT NOW! I really hope you like it.

Filed under no room for valor jukepop serials published creative writing horror stories

1,537 notes &

motivation for moving beyond your writing habits: 'Help, all of my characters are the same!'

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

We’ve been asked this question a few times so I decided to write a post on it rather than just answer one person. I hope this is somewhat useful…

Some things to bear in mind when you’re creating a character:

  • Appearance;
  • Personality;
  • Motivation.

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

Filed under writing reference characterization creative writing